MIDTERM II--STUDY GUIDE
[Revised 3/30/2010]

POTENTIAL ID'S:

BRYAN, MCKINLEY, THEODORE ROOSEVELT, SQUARE DEAL, PANAMA CANAL, TAFT, LA FOLLETTE, BULL MOOSE PARTY, WILSON, FEDERAL RESERVE ACT
 
FOURTEEN POINTS, LEAGUE OF NATIONS, GEORGE CREEL, KKK, BIRTH OF A NATION, AMENDMENT XIX, AMENDMENT XVIII

PROHIBITION, HARDING, COOLIDGE, SACCO AND VANZETTI, SCOPES TRIAL, BRYAN, ANDREW MELLON, HOOVER

FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT, NEW DEAL, FIRESIDE CHATS, WPA, (FDIC), (SEC), CCC, NATIONAL RECOVERY ACT, AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ACT, (FHA)

NYE COMMISSION, NEUTRALITY ACTS, LEND-LEASE, STALIN, PEARL HARBOR, NORMANDY INVASION, HIROSHIMA

(COLD WAR), YALTA, POTSDAM, TRUMAN, MARSHALL PLAN, KOREAN WAR, EISENHOWER, (MCCARTHY), DIEM, CASTRO, SPUTNIK, JOE KENNEDY, JACK KENNEDY, NEW FRONTIER, ICH BIN EIN BERLINER, CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS, BAY OF PIGS

POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS:

1.  In the early years of the 20th century, crusaders of various types (including three "progressive" presidents) took on all of the many evils plaguing American society-- crime, disease, corruption, poverty, ignorance, and injustice--and won!  At least, sort of.  Comment.

2.  Wars change things, and big wars change things a lot.  World War I changed America--or at least hastened the pace of change.  Some of these changes might have been good, but there was a sinister side to some of what was going on as well.  Comment.

2.  While there is a general consensus on which figures and events of the 1920's and 1930's are particularly important, there are major differences in interpreting just about every one of these figures and events.  Comment.

3.  Franklin D. Roosevelt promised the American people a "new deal," and he gave them just that.  Roosevelt's presidency saw many fundamental changes in the American political system.  These changes made Roosevelt a hero to many, and Roosevelt is one of the most loved presidents in American history--with good reason.  But many would argue that Roosevelt's "New Deal" was a raw deal, and Roosevelt also has the distinction of being one of the most hated of American presidents--with good reason!  Comment.

4. During the period after World War I, Americans tended to regard that war as a great mistake, and they were determined not to make such a mistake again.  America’s refusal to get involved in foreign conflicts made it seem like the country would forever be a pacifist, isolationist, and even cowardly nation.  World War II showed that this was not quite the case. Comment.
 
5. During the years that followed World War II, America reluctantly accepted its responsibilities as a major player in world affairs.  Despite sometimes disappointing leadership and more than a few major blunders, the country was still moderately successful in leading the free world through the difficult years of what is often called the Cold War. Comment.