HISTORY 413: THE HEBREWS
  REVISED FINAL EXAM STUDY GUIDE
[Spring 2016 Revision]


POTENTIAL ID'S:

(NEVIIM), (MINOR PROPHETS), AMOS, JEROBOAM II, ISAIAH, UZZIAH, (NAZAR), SERAPHIM, (SHEARJASHUB), IMMANUEL, MAHERSHALALHASHBAZ, HEZEKIAH, SENNECHARIB

JEREMIAH, ZEDEKIAH, HULDAH, BARUCH, (NECHO), GEDALIAH, LAMENTATIONS, PASHUR,  MERKABAH, TAMMUZ, GOG

EVI, EVII, EVIII, (QOHELETH), (VANITY), UNDER THE SUN,  (ZAKAN), WISDOM,  (MASHAL), PROVERB A, PROVERB B, PROVERB C (Note: EVI, EVII, and EVIII are any three Ecclesiastes verses of your choice, "Proverb A," "Proverb B, and Proverb C" are to be any three proverbs of your choice.)

JOB, SATAN, BILDAD THE SHUHITE, EUCATASTROPHE, (HABAKKUK), DANIEL, MESHACH, NEBUCHADNEZZAR, BELSHAZZAR

BABYLONIAN CAPTIVITY, CYRUS, ZERUBBABEL, EZRA, NEHEMIAH, HAGGAI, VATICINIUM EX EVENTU,  MALACHI, SYNAGOGUE, ANTIOCHUS EPHIPHANES, MACCABEES

POTENTIAL ESSAYS:

A. There are many ways in which the messages of the Hebrew prophets are rightly referred to as "burdens."  Clearly, however, these burdens were worth bearing. One can see both the prophetic burden and the reasons for bearing in Amos and Isaiah. Comment.

B. There are many ways in which the messages of the Hebrew prophets are rightly referred to as "burdens. Clearly, however,
these burdens were worth bearing.  One can see both the prophetic burden and the reasons for bearing it in Jeremiah and
Ezekiel. Comment.

C. The Hebrews may not have added much to human knowledge, but their contributions to human wisdom are very impressive. Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, and the Song of Solomon are particular good examples of this.  Comment.

D. One of the questions for those who believe in an all-powerful, all-knowing, and loving god is the problem of evil. Among the greatest contributions of the Hebrews to subsequent civilization are their attempts to explore and to answer this problem. Especially important are the explorations of evil in Habakkuk, Daniel, and Job.  Comment.

E. For Jews during the exile and for the post-exilic Jewish community, nothing seemed so important as Jerusalem and the
temple.  Yet it was the long struggle to rebuild and maintain the city and the sanctuary that enabled the Jewish community to
survive without either.  Comment.

Note:  Coins and Judaean History (http://www.electriciti.com/garstang/judaean/index.html) is an excellent online resource for the 168 BC--AD 135 period of Hebrew history.  If lecture seemed confusing (or if you missed the lecture), be sure to read through the material on this site.