[Revised 1/5/17)


STUDY GUIDE--MIDTERM II

POTENTIAL ID'S:

(PETER), (PHILIP), (STEPHEN), (SAUL OF TARSUS), (BARNABAS), (SILAS), (PRISCILLA), DAY OF PENTECOST, (AGRIPPA), (FELIX), (FESTUS), FAC I*, FAC II*, FAC III*, FAC IV*

I CORINTHIANS, ROMANS, II PETER, JUDE, CORINTH, APOLLOS, AGAPE, SARX, SOMA, ANASTASIS, GNOSTICISM, ENOCH, PISTIS, HAMARTIAS, NATURAL THEOLOGY, CHARIS

JAMES, EPHESIANS, I PETER, JAMES THE JUST, AGAPE, SOPHIA (wisdom), GLOSSA, ERGA, PLOUSIOS, MYSTERY RELIGION, EPHESUS, MYSTERIA, UPOTASSO, I PETER

APOCALYPSE, SEVEN CHURCHES, SEVEN SEALS, SEVENTH SEAL, SEVEN TRUMPETS, MYSTERY BABYLON, LITTLE APOCALYPSE, TWO WITNESSES, NEW JERUSALEM, MILLENNIUM

*FAC I, FAC II, FAC III, FAC IV are "Favorite Acts Characters I-IV."  For these potential  ID's, choose any figures who you find particularly interesting.  Any of the figures in parentheses above would make good choices.  You might also choose a somewhat more obscure character if you prefer


POTENTIAL ESSAYS:

A.  The Book of Acts is a key source in understanding the surprisingly rapid growth of the early church. Comment.

B.   All political, social, and religious organizations struggle with division. Had divisions in the early Church gotten out of hand immediately, Christianity would have struggled to survive.  The New Testament letters (particularly Romans, I Corinthians, II Peter, and Jude) show how Christian leaders handled potential divisions and succeeded in maintaining the unity critical to the success and growth of the church.  Comment.

C.   Many people in the Roman world were unhappy both with themselves and in their relationships with other people. The “mystery” religions helped somewhat in this area, but the New Testament letters (particularly James, Ephesians and I Peter) show that the church had even more to offer in helping people feel better about themselves and in helping them establish better relationships with other people. Comment.

D.  While Revelation is in many ways a difficult book, it is a beautiful book as well, and a book that goes a long way toward explaining the eventual triumph of Christianity.  Comment.