FIRST MIDTERM STUDY GUIDE
[Revised October 3, 2013, Spring 2015, and 1/5/2017]

POTENTIAL ID'S:

(GOSPEL), PHARISEES, SADDUCEES, GEMATRIYA, NAZAR, RABBI, JOHN THE BAPTIST, SERMON ON THE MOUNT, (PARABLE OF THE SOWER), (PARABLE OF THE TARES), (LITTLE APOCALYPSE)

LUKE, THEOPHILUS, SERMON ON THE PLAIN, SAMARITANS, LAZARUS, UNJUST STEWARD, PRODIGAL SON, ROAD TO EMMAUS

SYNOPTIC PROBLEM, F.C. BAUER, CONSISTENT ESCHATOLOGY, SOURCE CRITICISM, FORM CRITICISM, REDACTION CRITICISM, MARCAN PRIORITY, TEXTUAL CRITICISM

LOGOS, JOHN THE BAPTIST-J*, PHILIP, AGAPE, LAZARUS-J*, PETER-J*, THOMAS, PILATE, PHARISEES-J*, CANA

*When there is a “J” after the term, I want you to discuss how John’s Gospel supplements and complements the synoptic gospel presentation of this figure/ter


POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS:

A.  The Gospel of Matthew might be described as the gospel for those who do not think they need the gospel.  In particular, the gospel seems to be addressed specifically to Jewish sects like the Pharisees and the Sadducees.  Comment.

B.  While the Gospel of Luke is in many ways similar to the Gospel of Matthew, there are some important differences between the Gospels.  Many of these differences can be explained by the fact that Luke is addressed to a different audience.  While Matthew is a gospel well suited to Jews, Luke is a gospel particularly well suited to the needs and interests of gentiles.  Comment.

C.  Paul's comment about those who become fools by professing themselves to be wise certainly applies to modern New Testament scholarship.  Comment.

D.  The Gospel of John is in some ways very different from the synoptic gospels.  However, the picture of Jesus and his teachings given in the gospel does not conflict with that of the synoptics but complements and supplements it--sometimes in surprising ways.  Comment.